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5 Ways To Work Smart, Not Hard

You’ve heard the phrase “Work smart, not hard.” But what does it really mean. Here’s an article about working smart. Success is often a result of hard work.  But it’s important to recognize that failure, too, is often a result of hard work.  As leaders, we must recognize the difference between working hard and working smart; not just for ourselves, but for those we lead. Leaders work smart, not hard Here’s a simple truth: working hard on the wrong things does not make one successful.  Too many people work hard at making sure that they’re doing things right, but fail to consider first whether they’re doing the right things. Here are a few signs that one may be falling into that rut: They work hard throughout the day, but at the end of the day wonder if what they’ve done really made all that much of a difference.  They work hard but don’t feel like they get the recognition that they deserve. They work tirelessly but it rarely feels like they accomplish much of anything. Their task list is endless and they often feel overwhelmed. If you can identify, take solace in the knowledge that it is entirely our doing, and that means that it can be entirely our undoing. Here are a few actions that one can take now to begin to turn things around. Plan It sounds so simple but it may be the single greatest deficiency in the workplace today.  We live in an attention- seeking world where cell phone chirps, email alerts, social media posts, and people all vie for our attention. If we don’t plan our time, someone else will, and when that happens, we live life in a state of constant reaction.  Planning our time allows us to focus our attention on the important, not just on the urgent. It can begin with a calendar, a day planner or a task manager.  By prioritizing our work then blocking out time for those things that are most important to us, we begin to guard our time for activities that have a high impact.  Work/ life balance means that we must also be intentional about planning time for our families and for our relationships then sticking to the plan. Share Priorities Our teams cannot possibly know what our top priorities are unless we share them.  I share my Outlook calendar with my executive team.  By doing so, I put both parties in a position to plan rather than to react.  If they need something from me, they have a tool to plan their time around my priorities. At SEI, individual ROIs and 5/15s are shared across the organization on our intranet.  It’s a great way to help teams align their goals and for everyone to see what our top priorities are. Leaders who care about results appreciate an employee who takes a proactive approach to sharing their schedule and communicating their priorities. When you set your priorities and do the things that are the most important, you’re working smart, not hard. Read the complete article at: Ronalvesteffer.com

How to Do What You Love

When you do what you love and do what you enjoy, you’ll find that you’ve given up work completely. Here’s how to do what you love:  To do something well you have to like it. That idea is not exactly novel. We've got it down to four words: "Do what you love." But it's not enough just to tell people that. Doing what you love is complicated. The very idea is foreign to what most of us learn as kids. When I was a kid, it seemed as if work and fun were opposites by definition. Life had two states: some of the time adults were making you do things, and that was called work; the rest of the time you could do what you wanted, and that was called playing. Occasionally the things adults made you do were fun, just as, occasionally, playing wasn't—for example, if you fell and hurt yourself. But except for these few anomalous cases, work was pretty much defined as not-fun. And it did not seem to be an accident. School, it was implied, was tedious because it was preparation for grownup work. The world then was divided into two groups, grownups and kids. Grownups, like some kind of cursed race, had to work. Kids didn't, but they did have to go to school, which was a dilute version of work meant to prepare us for the real thing. Much as we disliked school, the grownups all agreed that grownup work was worse, and that we had it easy. Teachers in particular all seemed to believe implicitly that work was not fun. Which is not surprising: work wasn't fun for most of them. Why did we have to memorize state capitals instead of playing dodgeball? For the same reason they had to watch over a bunch of kids instead of lying on a beach. You couldn't just do what you wanted. I'm not saying we should let little kids do whatever they want. They may have to be made to work on certain things. But if we make kids work on dull stuff, it might be wise to tell them that tediousness is not the defining quality of work, and indeed that the reason they have to work on dull stuff now is so they can work on more interesting stuff later. Once, when I was about 9 or 10, my father told me I could be whatever I wanted when I grew up, so long as I enjoyed it. I remember that precisely because it seemed so anomalous. It was like being told to use dry water. Whatever I thought he meant, I didn't think he meant work could literally be fun—fun like playing. It took me years to grasp that. Believe it or not work can actually be fun. It’s all in your attitude. Read the complete article at: PaulGraham.com

Three Steps For Finding Your Perfect Job, Career,

And Life

People who have found what they like to do in life are the happiest people I know. Here’s how to find your perfect job and you perfect life. Finding your perfect job, career and life may be easier said than done, but with strong commitment, focus and effort it is possible. Luckily, your return on investment should far outweigh the toil. What would you give to have your perfect job, career, and life? People who are happiest and most fulfilled live what is the perfect job, career and life for them. This does not mean living their life would be perfect for you. Like a snowflake, perfection is defined individually. It is achievable for anyone willing to put the effort into defining, discovering and pursuing it. The perfect job, career and life comes in many shapes and sizes which usually equates to happiness, fulfillment and success. Examine Richard Branson’s journey. He is making billions living the life he was meant to live. He is clearly having fun doing what he loves and does best. An ex-corporate executive I recently met now spends her days in an apron covered in clay, running a pottery making shop out of the back of her home. She makes a fraction of what she made before, but loves what she does and the life that goes along with it. For her, she has achieved perfection and success. Both Richard Branson and my friend have the perfect job, career and life for them. They are happy and engaged in their lives. They designed their lives intentionally and on purpose. You can, too. What is your perfection? Not what has been defined for you by your family and friends, but your perfection defined by you. Below are three steps and strategies from my new book How to Find a Job, Career and Life You Love to help you answer the above question and start pursuing your perfect job, career and life. Eight Questions To Light Your Path The first step in your journey is to understand what you are most passionate about, love and naturally do best. To do this, ask and answer the following eight questions. Once you have your responses, review them to look for themes and clues as to what jobs you should try. I recommend sleeping on your responses and themes prior to committing to any conclusions from this exercise. What gets me out of bed in the morning? If I didn’t need money, what would I do in life? What was I most fascinated with as a child? When in my life have I been so passionately focused on an activity that I lost track of time and what was I doing? What do I want to be remembered for in life? What do I believe I do best? What do others say I do best? What am I most recognized for in life and work? Ask yourself the questions above and the answers will lead you to a happier life. Read the complete article at: Forbes.com i
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“Work hard, enjoy your life, be creative”

Work And Life News

Work Smart Not Hard

Assess everything that needs to be done. Before you plunge into something headfirst, remember that enthusiasm needs to be tempered with wisdom. Look over every aspect of the job, and allow yourself ample "pondering time" so that you can be sure that every detail is accomplished on time and accurately Make an outline. Whether it's in your head or on paper, you should have a checklist in mind and follow it in order. You don't want to repeat steps, duplicate the efforts of others, make mistakes or forget anything. Learn to say no. Avoid over- scheduling yourself and be realistic about what you can accomplish in a single day. Sometimes you just have to cut yourself off because in most professions, there is almost always something that could be done Limit your goals. Try to avoid multi-tasking because you often get less done since your brain is switching back and forth between tasks. Pick one thing to work on and put your best effort into that until it is accomplished. Read the complete article at: WikiHow
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Copyright WrorkLifeCreativity,net 2010  

5 Ways To Work Smart, Not Hard

You’ve heard the phrase “Work smart, not hard.” But what does it really mean. Here’s an article about working smart. Success is often a result of hard work.  But it’s important to recognize that failure, too, is often a result of hard work.  As leaders, we must recognize the difference between working hard and working smart; not just for ourselves, but for those we lead. Leaders work smart, not hard Here’s a simple truth: working hard on the wrong things does not make one successful.  Too many people work hard at making sure that they’re doing things right, but fail to consider first whether they’re doing the right things. Here are a few signs that one may be falling into that rut: They work hard throughout the day, but at the end of the day wonder if what they’ve done really made all that much of a difference.  They work hard but don’t feel like they get the recognition that they deserve. They work tirelessly but it rarely feels like they accomplish much of anything. Their task list is endless and they often feel overwhelmed. If you can identify, take solace in the knowledge that it is entirely our doing, and that means that it can be entirely our undoing. Here are a few actions that one can take now to begin to turn things around. Plan It sounds so simple but it may be the single greatest deficiency in the workplace today.  We live in an attention-seeking world where cell phone chirps, email alerts, social media posts, and people all vie for our attention. If we don’t plan our time, someone else will, and when that happens, we live life in a state of constant reaction.  Planning our time allows us to focus our attention on the important, not just on the urgent. It can begin with a calendar, a day planner or a task manager.  By prioritizing our work then blocking out time for those things that are most important to us, we begin to guard our time for activities that have a high impact.  Work/ life balance means that we must also be intentional about planning time for our families and for our relationships then sticking to the plan. Share Priorities Our teams cannot possibly know what our top priorities are unless we share them.  I share my Outlook calendar with my executive team.  By doing so, I put both parties in a position to plan rather than to react.  If they need something from me, they have a tool to plan their time around my priorities. At SEI, individual ROIs and 5/15s are shared across the organization on our intranet.  It’s a great way to help teams align their goals and for everyone to see what our top priorities are. Leaders who care about results appreciate an employee who takes a proactive approach to sharing their schedule and communicating their priorities. When you set your priorities and do the things that are the most important, you’re working smart, not hard. Read the complete article at: Ronalvesteffer.com

How to Do What You Love

When you do what you love and do what you enjoy, you’ll find that you’ve given up work completely. Here’s how to do what you love:  To do something well you have to like it. That idea is not exactly novel. We've got it down to four words: "Do what you love." But it's not enough just to tell people that. Doing what you love is complicated. The very idea is foreign to what most of us learn as kids. When I was a kid, it seemed as if work and fun were opposites by definition. Life had two states: some of the time adults were making you do things, and that was called work; the rest of the time you could do what you wanted, and that was called playing. Occasionally the things adults made you do were fun, just as, occasionally, playing wasn't—for example, if you fell and hurt yourself. But except for these few anomalous cases, work was pretty much defined as not-fun. And it did not seem to be an accident. School, it was implied, was tedious because it was preparation for grownup work. The world then was divided into two groups, grownups and kids. Grownups, like some kind of cursed race, had to work. Kids didn't, but they did have to go to school, which was a dilute version of work meant to prepare us for the real thing. Much as we disliked school, the grownups all agreed that grownup work was worse, and that we had it easy. Teachers in particular all seemed to believe implicitly that work was not fun. Which is not surprising: work wasn't fun for most of them. Why did we have to memorize state capitals instead of playing dodgeball? For the same reason they had to watch over a bunch of kids instead of lying on a beach. You couldn't just do what you wanted. I'm not saying we should let little kids do whatever they want. They may have to be made to work on certain things. But if we make kids work on dull stuff, it might be wise to tell them that tediousness is not the defining quality of work, and indeed that the reason they have to work on dull stuff now is so they can work on more interesting stuff later. Once, when I was about 9 or 10, my father told me I could be whatever I wanted when I grew up, so long as I enjoyed it. I remember that precisely because it seemed so anomalous. It was like being told to use dry water. Whatever I thought he meant, I didn't think he meant work could literally be fun—fun like playing. It took me years to grasp that. Believe it or not work can actually be fun. It’s all in your attitude. Read the complete article at: PaulGraham.com

Three Steps For Finding Your

Perfect Job, Career, And Life

People who have found what they like to do in life are the happiest people I know. Here’s how to find your perfect job and you perfect life. Finding your perfect job, career and life may be easier said than done, but with strong commitment, focus and effort it is possible. Luckily, your return on investment should far outweigh the toil. What would you give to have your perfect job, career, and life? People who are happiest and most fulfilled live what is the perfect job, career and life for them. This does not mean living their life would be perfect for you. Like a snowflake, perfection is defined individually. It is achievable for anyone willing to put the effort into defining, discovering and pursuing it. The perfect job, career and life comes in many shapes and sizes which usually equates to happiness, fulfillment and success. Examine Richard Branson’s journey. He is making billions living the life he was meant to live. He is clearly having fun doing what he loves and does best. An ex-corporate executive I recently met now spends her days in an apron covered in clay, running a pottery making shop out of the back of her home. She makes a fraction of what she made before, but loves what she does and the life that goes along with it. For her, she has achieved perfection and success. Both Richard Branson and my friend have the perfect job, career and life for them. They are happy and engaged in their lives. They designed their lives intentionally and on purpose. You can, too. What is your perfection? Not what has been defined for you by your family and friends, but your perfection defined by you. Below are three steps and strategies from my new book How to Find a Job, Career and Life You Love to help you answer the above question and start pursuing your perfect job, career and life. Eight Questions To Light Your Path The first step in your journey is to understand what you are most passionate about, love and naturally do best. To do this, ask and answer the following eight questions. Once you have your responses, review them to look for themes and clues as to what jobs you should try. I recommend sleeping on your responses and themes prior to committing to any conclusions from this exercise. What gets me out of bed in the morning? If I didn’t need money, what would I do in life? What was I most fascinated with as a child? When in my life have I been so passionately focused on an activity that I lost track of time and what was I doing? What do I want to be remembered for in life? What do I believe I do best? What do others say I do best? What am I most recognized for in life and work? Ask yourself the questions above and the answers will lead you to a happier life. Read the complete article at: Forbes.com i
“Dolore exercitation aliqua non occaecat”

Work And Life News

Work Smart Not Hard

Assess everything that needs to be done. Before you plunge into something headfirst, remember that enthusiasm needs to be tempered with wisdom. Look over every aspect of the job, and allow yourself ample "pondering time" so that you can be sure that every detail is accomplished on time and accurately Make an outline. Whether it's in your head or on paper, you should have a checklist in mind and follow it in order. You don't want to repeat steps, duplicate the efforts of others, make mistakes or forget anything. Learn to say no. Avoid over-scheduling yourself and be realistic about what you can accomplish in a single day. Sometimes you just have to cut yourself off because in most professions, there is almost always something that could be done Limit your goals. Try to avoid multi-tasking because you often get less done since your brain is switching back and forth between tasks. Pick one thing to work on and put your best effort into that until it is accomplished. Read the complete article at: WikiHow